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Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Can Serious Games Accelerate Ghana's Development?


 

RSVP now to join the next Technology Salon

May 26th Accra Salon - RSVP Now

Electronic games are a two trillion dollar global industry. Game development in Ghana is growing rapidly, fueled by the popularity of mobile phones and climbing Internet usage rates. African game developers are increasing their share of this demand by developing culturally relevant games that speak directly to local markets.

What is the potential of the game industry to further Ghana's development?

While games are often considered frivolous entertainment, evidence shows that games can effectively improve cognition, problem solving, and spatial skills development, with a particular benefit for science, engineering, and mathematics education. "Serious" games can also help communities explore different development scenarios to solve critical problems in society.

Please RSVP now to join the next Technology Salon Accra where we will explore questions like:

  • What kinds of games would excite Ghanaians and improve society?
  • Who would play them? What would they learn?
  • How can we incentivize "good" games and improve others?
  • Where should we look to see the future of gaming in Ghana?

We'll have three key thought leaders to guide our discussions on Africa's buzzing technology scene and how it can support game development in Ghana:

Please RSVP now to join them and your technology and development peers for Technology Salon Accra. We'll have hot coffee, breakfast, and cool games to play for a morning rush. However, seating is limited to 35 people, so RSVP now or you'll be on the wait list!

Games for Ghana's Development
May Technology Salon Accra
8:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday, May 26th
Accra, Ghana
RSVP is Required

About the Technology Salon


The Technology Salon™ is an intimate, informal, and in person, discussion between information and communication technology experts and international development professionals, with a focus on both:

  • technology's impact on donor-sponsored technical assistance delivery, and
  • private enterprise driven economic development, facilitated by technology.

Our meetings are lively conversations, not boring presentations. Attendance is capped at 35 people - and frank participation with ideas, opinions, and predictions is actively encouraged. 

It's also a great opportunity to meet others motivated to employ technology to solve vexing development problems. Join us today!

 

 


Friday, May 08, 2015

The Anatomy of the Resource Curse: Predatory Investment in Africa's Extractive Industries


While the natural resource curse is typically considered an economic phenomenon, unregulated access to billions of dollars in natural resource revenues has profound effects on governance and the politicization of the security sector. Given the opaque nature of many of the transactions involved, however, relatively little is known about how these relationships work in practice.

 

In this latest Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) Special Report, "The Anatomy of the Resource Curse: Predatory Investment in Africa's Extractive Industries," J.R. Mailey delves into the often murky linkages between senior government officials, unscrupulous natural resource investors, and the loopholes they exploit in the international financial system. 

 

By tracing the actions of the Hong Kong-based Queensway Group, a major actor in Africa's extractive sector, through case studies on Angola, Guinea, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe, the report provides a detailed portrait of the mechanics that perpetuate the inequitable development, weak institutions, and instability so frequently observed in Africa's 20+ resource-rich countries. (Click here to access the report.)


Thursday, May 07, 2015

Report : The Anatomy of the Resource Curse

The Anatomy of the Resource Curse
While the natural resource curse is typically considered an economic phenomenon, unregulated access to billions of dollars in natural resource revenues has profound effects on governance and the politicization of the security sector. Given the opaque nature of many of the transactions involved, however, relatively little is known about how these relationships work in practice.

 

In this latest ACSS Special Report, "The Anatomy of the Resource Curse: Predatory Investment in Africa's Extractive Industries," J.R. Mailey delves into the often murky linkages between senior government officials, unscrupulous natural resource investors, and the loopholes they exploit in the international financial system. 

 

By tracing the actions of the Hong Kong-based Queensway Group, a major actor in Africa's extractive sector, through case studies on Angola, Guinea, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe, the report provides a detailed portrait of the mechanics that perpetuate the inequitable development, weak institutions, and instability so frequently observed in Africa's 20+ resource-rich countries. (Click here to access the report.)